Tag Archives: Founders

What to consider in your startup job offer

Photo credit: Unfinished Business movie stock image

Photo credit: Unfinished Business movie stock image

Every week someone asks me for advice about a startup job offer. I have no idea why people reach out to me about this. I’m not an expert on job negotiation by any means; but I have done a fair amount of hiring and deal making as an entrepreneur.

This post relays the main advice that I typically share to friends considering their startup offer. Hopefully I can use this post to direct my job-hunting network and save myself some time typing this advice over and over again. 🙂

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Let’s destroy this myth

I’m super excited to announce that Hustle Con 2015 is officially happening on April 24, 2015 in San Francisco! This is an event for non-techies who are interested in starting startups, and it’s the third year we’re hosting this event.

So what is the point of our conference? Why do we exist when there are a gazillion other tech conferences?

Well, my team and I are on a mission to destroy a myth: that you need to be a techie in order to start a startup.

I meet so many would-be entrepreneurs every year who have awesome startup ideas, but are afraid. They make excuses like this:

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Should you do a startup with your spouse?

Spouse Founders

DON’T DO IT.

That’s my initial gut reaction whenever someone asks me whether it’s wise to work with a spouse or family member.

My wife and I have been running our startup together for the past five years; don’t get me wrong, we love it! We enjoy the challenge of building a business together and appreciate the unique value that each of us brings to our work. Our work life is a huge source of joy in our marriage.

But here’s the truth: you can truly love someone as a person, but still be incompatible with him or her as a professional.

Not being able to work with someone you love says absolutely nothing about the strength of your relationship to that person. Personal complementarity does not correlate directly with professional complementarity. When conflicts arise with your spouse in a professional setting, you risk having those issues bleed into your personal life as well. For that reason, I believe that it’s generally too risky to work with a loved one because the cost of failure could be the failure of your relationship (how much is that worth to you?).

Nevertheless, if you still want to see whether you and your spouse can make it as a startup team, consider the following scenarios to test your professional complementarity.

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